Around the Web: The Awesome Debate, Poetry, Books, and Reading

20 Apr 2018

Welcome back book friends! We’re pretty busy gearing up for the release of The Boatman at the end of the month (April 30th, to be exact), but that doesn’t mean we aren’t sneaking time to check book twitter and browse the web. There’s always time for more reading, right? Here’s what we found this week.

 

Poet Facts

 

It’s still poetry month and Mental Floss has just the info to supplement all the poetry you’ve been reading: info on your favourite poets. From writing preferences to pets and influences, this article may give you the edge at literary trivia.

 

Everything is Awesome (or is it?)

 

Celebrated scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson may have a problem with using “awesome” to describe things that aren’t “inspiring awe,” but Mirriam Webster’s Dictionary doesn’t abide such strict usage. After a Twitter exchange that amused onlookers, the dictionary shared a bit more on the usage of "awesome" and its close relative “awful.” Word nerds should definitely check it out.

 

How Much Do You Read?

 

Since you’re here, I’m guessing a fair amount. But if you’re wondering how you compare, Pew Research just came out with a new study on reading habits. Apparently, the average American reads twelve books a year and thirty-nine percent read in print exclusively.

 

Girdle Books

 

Nowadays, when you need a book on hand regularly, there's usually an app or digital copy you can access on your phone. But, according to Altas Obscura, way back before the ubiquity of hand hand computers, there were girdle books—books that you could attach to your girdle or belt. Convenient? Maybe. But I'm not sure they'll make a comeback. 

 

On Forgetting Books

 

Next up, author C.D. Rose discusses the books you can’t remember over on Electric Lit. Obviously, authors (and publishers!) would like you to remember their books so that you can recommend them to others, but Rose does capture what’s compelling about those books from days gone by that you can’t quite recall. What do you think, is there value in books you can’t remember? Let us know in the comments.

 

 That's it for this weeks, folks. Hope you have a weekend filled with reading!

 

 

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